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Forget about the size of a penis – what about vagina length?

Have you ever thought about the length of a vagina?
Have you ever thought about the length of a vagina? (Picture: Getty Images)

From jibes about small d*ck energy, to chatter about growers or showers; men’s members have long been a hot topic.

The average penis length – 5.2 inches when erect – is highly publicised, but we often overlook the size of female genitalia.

Perhaps you’ve never considered what the average length of a vagina is (and, well, you wouldn’t be the only one), but they do vary from person to person and it is key to understanding female pleasure and experience.

In poor practice, let’s skip the foreplay: the average vagina depth is two to six inches. This is for an adult woman in a relaxed state, and it’s the distance between the vulva and the cervix.

But, does this mean that some penises don’t fit some vaginas? Metro.co.uk enlisted the help of Dr Danae Maragouthakis, resident medical director at sexual health start-up Yoxly, to put all your queries to bed.

A grapefruit representing the vagina, which increases in length and width when aroused
The vagina increases in length and width when aroused (Picture: Getty Images/iStockphoto)

Is it safe for a longer penis to be fully inserted inside a smaller vagina?

Danae explains: ‘The vagina is an incredibly elastic and muscular organ, designed to expand and contract, so that things may go in (e.g. a penis) or come out (e.g. a baby).

‘During sexual arousal, the vagina becomes wider and longer, and produces a natural lubrication, to safely accommodate and facilitate penetration.’

So, essentially the body is great at shifting and adjusting to accommodate larger objects, but Danae agrees that you know your body best and should always do what feels right for you.

‘If something hurts, or is uncomfortable, then you should stop and communicate this to your partner,’ she adds.

While men who are well-endowed could be slightly intimidating for their sexual partner, the vagina can stretch and lengthen to accommodate this, as long as you’re aroused and comfortable.

When you are aroused, Danae tells Metro: ‘The cervix and uterus elevate, nearly doubling the length of the vagina. It’s a highly elastic and muscular organ that can expand and contract in both width and length.’

We all know that the vagina is a pretty cool organ, after all, during childbirth is can stretch to fit a newborn’s head, which Danae says averages 13 inches in circumference.

So, how does the vagina actually stretch and change size?

‘The vagina’s ability to accommodate can be attributed to its anatomy,’ Danae tells Metro.

‘Its walls have multiple layers: mucosal tissue on the surface, with smooth muscle tissue, collagen, and elastin fibres underneath, providing structure and stretchiness.

‘The walls are also covered with folds, called rugae, which allow the vagina to stretch when pressure is applied to the sides.’

When were relaxed, the walls of the vagina are flatten against each other, compressed by the surrounding organs and tissues.

Despite its amazing abilities, this doesn’t mean that having certain things up there, like a speculum, for example, is always a pleasant experience for women – and this is totally normal.



A common misconception about vaginas:

YouGov survey found nearly half of British women were unsure about the location of the vagina. (FYI, although we use the term colloquially to mean the full shebang, the vagina is technically the tube that runs from the vulva – the outside bit – to the cervix, which is the neck of the womb.)

The number one misconception is that vagina’s get looser with more sex. This is not true.

There are lots of things that can lead to the perception of ‘tightness’. If you’re tense or anxious, your muscles may tense too, as they may do if you’re not aroused. A lack of lubrication can also make it feel tighter.

Read here for some more vaginal myth busting…

We don’t know about you but, while it’s nothing to be worried about, a pelvic exam which involves a speculum isn’t always that fun.

Did you know that, despite the known misogyny in medicine, certain accommodations are actually made for your anatomy in instances like pelvic exams?

Danae explains: ‘Speculums come in different sizes. Providers will select an appropriate size, based on the patient’s anatomy, medical history, comfort level, and the purpose of the examination.

‘Most speculums open the vaginal walls between one to 1.5 inches, providers can adjust the exact width to ensure patient comfort and adequate visibility.’

So, whether it’s a medical exam, a baby or a large member, know that your vagina is built to handle it, and do what’s comfortable for you.

Do you have a story to share?

Get in touch by emailing MetroLifestyleTeam@Metro.co.uk.

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